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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

5 edition of Excitatory amino acid receptors found in the catalog.

Excitatory amino acid receptors

design of agonists and antagonists

  • 237 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by E. Horwood in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Excitatory amino acids -- Agonists.,
  • Excitatory amino acids -- Antagonists.,
  • Excitatory amino acids -- Receptors.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementeditors, P. Krogsgaard-Larsen, J.J. Hansen.
    SeriesEllis Horwood series in pharmaceutical technology
    ContributionsKrogsgaard-Larsen, Povl., Hansen, J. J. 1944-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRM666.E87 E93 1992
    The Physical Object
    Pagination382 p. :
    Number of Pages382
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1564363M
    ISBN 100132967162
    LC Control Number91046025

    The thirty original contributions in this book provide an up-to-date, interdisciplinary account of current research activity in all aspects of excitatory amino acid transmitters, particularly glutamate and aspartate, in the context of the structure and function of the cerebral cortex in health and in disease. It has recently become clear that the excitatory amino acids and their receptors are. Among the molecules used to classify excitatory amino acid receptors, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was the most potent (EC50 5 X 10(-4) M). Kainic and quisqualic acids were almost completely inactive. 3. The responses to L-Glu were competitively antagonized by 2-aminophosphonovaleric acid.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). It regulates normal CNS function, is a major participant in pathology, and serves learning, memory, and higher cognitive functions. The 12 chapters of this book provide the first comprehensive. McLennan H, Liu J. The action of six antagonists of the excitatory amino acids on neurones of the rat spinal cord. Exp Brain Res. ; 45 ()– McLennan H, Lodge D. The antagonism of amino acid-induced excitation of spinal neurones in the cat. Brain Res. Jun 15; (1)–

    excitatory amino acids: [eksī′tətôr′ē] one of a group of amino acids that affect the central nervous system by acting as neurotransmitters and in some cases as neurotoxins. Examples include glutamate and aspartate, which cause depolarization but may also trigger the death of neurons. Some excitatory amino acids are produced by plants and fungi. To study the roles of peripheral excitatory amino acids receptor subtypes N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in persistent nociception, extracellular single unit recording technique was used to assess the effects of a single dose NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists, AP(5) (5-aminophosphonovaleric acid) and CNQX (6-cyanonitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) or DNQX (6,7.


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Excitatory amino acid receptors Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excitatory amino acid receptor agonists and antagonists are therefore of major interest as potential drugs for central nervous system disorders. Excitatory Amino Acids is the first book entirely dedicated to the results of human testing of modulators of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters.

The activation of excitatory amino acid receptors by glutamate normally produces a fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (Figure a).However, of the three subtypes of excitatory amino acid receptors (see Chapter 10), that which is selective for N-methyl-d-aspartate produces long-lasting, burst-like activity similar to a paroxysmal depolarizing shift, when activated by glutamate in a larger.

EXCITATORY AMINO ACIDS. Excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmission has been determined to be crucial to the process of long-term potentiation (LTP), which is thought to play an important role in learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity (Wroblewski and Danysz, ).

Five classes of EAA receptors have been identified in CNS. The excitatory potency of the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate in various regions of the central nervous system (CNS) has been recognized since the s.1,2 Nevertheless, the earlier findings that these amino acids are (1) constituents of intermediary metabolism and are (2) located in the brain ubiquitously in high concentrations rendered them unlikely candidates as by: Abstract.

The potent neuroexcitatory effects of acidic amino acids were first Excitatory amino acid receptors book over 25 years ago (Hayashi, ). In the interim, through the sustained efforts of several neurophysiologic laboratories, evidence has accrued that glutamic acid and possibly aspartic acid may serve as excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (Curtis et al., ; Curtis and Cited by: Ionotropic receptors are further functionally cate­gorized into NMDA and non-NMDA receptor subtypes (2-amino[3-hydroxymethylisoxazolyl]propionic acid [AMPA] and kainate receptors).

AMPA and kainate receptors are prevalent within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and activation is thought to mediate rapid excitatory. Author: Brian S. Meldrum Publisher: Editoriale Jaca Book ISBN: Size: MB Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi View: Get Books Presents findings on excitatory amino acids from leading researchers.

An overview of neurochemical studies on glutamate-mediated neurotransmission is followed by over 80 studies in areas including anatomy, molecular biology, electrophysiology, pharmacology. The amino acid neurotransmitters, glutamate, glycine, and GABA, are almost exclusively associated with just one effect.

Glutamate is considered an excitatory amino acid, but only because Glu receptors in the adult cause depolarization of the postsynaptic cell. Collins G. () Some effects of excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists on synaptic transmission in the rat olfactory cortex slice Brain Res– PubMed Google Scholar Cotman C.

() Isolation of Synaptosomal and Synaptic Plasma Membrane Fractions, in Methods in Enzymology (Flisher L. and Pal-ker L., eds.), pp Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume ) Log in to check access.

Buy eBook. USD Buy eBook. USD Instant download Excitatory Amino Acids: Receptor Interactions. Front Matter. Pages PDF. Anatomical Organization of Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors and Their Properties. Glutamate transporters and metabotropic receptors regulate excitatory neurotransmission in the medial entorhinal cortex of the rat Brain Res.

Nov 19;() doi: /es   Amino acids are the most abundant neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are synthesized and stored in presynaptic terminals, released from terminals upon stimulation with specific receptors on the postsynaptic cells. Chemical and electrical synapses are specialized biological structures found in the nervous system; they connect neurons together and transmit signals across Author: Manorama Patri.

An excitatory amino acid receptor agonist, or glutamate receptor agonist, is a chemical substance which agonizes one or more of the glutamate receptors. Examples include: AMPA; Glutamic acid; Ibotenic acid; Kainic acid; N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid; Quisqualic acid; See also.

Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist; Excitatory amino acid reuptake inhibitor. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid that functions as the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter for the central nervous system (CNS). It functions to reduce neuronal excitability by inhibiting nerve transmission.

GABAergic neurons are located when the hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, and brainstem. The balance between inhibitory neuronal transmission via. An excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, or glutamate receptor antagonist, is a chemical substance which antagonizes one or more of the glutamate receptors.

Examples include: AP5; Barbiturates; Dextromethorphan; Dextrorphan; Dizocilpine; Ethanol; Ibogaine; Ifenprodil; Ketamine; Kynurenic acid; Memantine; Nitrous oxide. Abstract. The neurotransmitters of the cochlear nucleus (CN) have received considerable attention, but probably the most important class of neurotransmitters, the excitatory amino acids (EAAs), is also the least understood not only in the CN, but throughout the central nervous system.

Abstract. Speculation on the possible role played by the physiologically occurring dicarboxylic amino acids L-aspartate and L-glutamate has continued from the time that Hayashi () first described the marked excitatory action of the latter compound on the general electrical activity of the cerebral cortex.

Ionotropic and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors are localized on striatal neurons. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are unevenly distributed in the basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits.

The receptors that respond to excitatory amino acids, particularly to glutamate, may be ionotropic or metabotropic (see Chap. 15). Book: All Authors / Contributors: David Lodge, Ph. D.; Biological Council. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: The Pharmacological Characterization of Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors; Requirements for Activation and Blockade of EAA Receptors; Specificity of Excitatory Amino Acids and Antagonists.

Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors. In the mammalian central nervous system, the excitatory amino acids (principally glutamate and aspartate) function as neurotransmitters that bind to at least three recognized receptors: the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), quisqualate, and kainic acid receptors (Watkins and Evans, ).

The involvement of excitatory amino acid receptors in peripheral nociceptive processing was assessed in two separate experiments. In the first, one knee joint cavity of rats was injected with ml of L-glutamate ( mM; mM; mM), L-aspartate ( mM; mM: mM), L-arginine ( mM) or different combinations of these amino acids.ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages: illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm: Contents: Excitatory amino acids, excitotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders / Dirk Sauer and Graham E.

Fagg --Excitatory amino acid receptors: multiplicity and ligand selectivity of receptor subtypes / Povl Krogsgaard-Larsen [and others] --Isolation and structural. Excitatory amino acid receptor agonists and antagonists are therefore of major interest as potential drugs for central nervous system disorders.

Excitatory Amino Acids is the first book entirely dedicated to the results of human testing of modulators of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters.